Where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

Our federal government has three parts. They are the Executive, (President and about 5,, workers) Legislative (Senate and House of Representatives). The United States has three branches of government: the executive, the legislative and the judicial. Learn what they do, and how they work for you. to facilitate such day-to-day responsibilities of the federal government as. study laws to see if they are correct according to the Constitution. 9. Where do the major branches of our federal government meet and work?.

The powers of Congress are limited to those enumerated in the Constitution; all other powers are reserved to the states and the people. The Constitution also includes the " Necessary and Proper Clause ", which grants Congress the power to "make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers".

Members of the House and Senate are elected by first-past-the-post voting in every state except Louisiana and Georgiawhich have runoffs. Impeachment of federal officers Main article: Impeachment in the United States Congress has the power to remove the president, federal judges, and other federal officers from office.

where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

The House of Representatives and Senate have separate roles in this process. The House must first vote to "impeach" the official.

Federal government of the United States - Wikipedia

Then, a trial is held in the Senate to decide whether the official should be removed from office. Although two presidents have been impeached by the House of Representatives Andrew Johnson and Bill Clintonneither of them was removed following trial in the Senate. Congressional procedures Article I, Section 2, paragraph 2 of the U. Constitution gives each chamber the power to "determine the rules of its proceedings".

From this provision were created congressional committeeswhich do the work of drafting legislation and conducting congressional investigations into national matters.

The th Congress — had 19 standing committees in the House and 17 in the Senate, plus 4 joint permanent committees with members from both houses overseeing the Library of Congressprinting, taxation, and the economy.

In addition, each house may name special, or select, committees to study specific problems. Today, much of the congressional workload is borne by the subcommittees, of which there are around The Constitution grants numerous powers to Congress. Enumerated in Article I, Section 8, these include the powers to levy and collect taxes ; to coin money and regulate its value; provide for punishment for counterfeiting; establish post offices and roads, issue patents, create federal courts inferior to the Supreme Courtcombat piracies and feloniesdeclare warraise and support armiesprovide and maintain a navymake rules for the regulation of land and naval forces, provide for, arm and discipline the militiaexercise exclusive legislation in the District of Columbiaand to make laws necessary to properly execute powers.

Over the two centuries since the United States was formed, many disputes have arisen over the limits on the powers of the federal government. These disputes have often been the subject of lawsuits that have ultimately been decided by the United States Supreme Court.

Congressional oversight Main article: Congressional oversight Congressional oversight is intended to prevent waste and fraud, protect civil liberties and individual rights, ensure executive compliance with the law, gather information for making laws and educating the public, and evaluate executive performance.

Legislative Branch - HISTORY

Congress's oversight function takes many forms: Committee inquiries and hearings Formal consultations with and reports from the president Senate advice and consent for presidential nominations and for treaties House impeachment proceedings and subsequent Senate trials House and Senate proceedings under the 25th Amendment in the event that the president becomes disabled or the office of the vice president falls vacant Informal meetings between legislators and executive officials Congressional membership: Each state is allocated two senators regardless of its population.

Executive branch See also: Article Two of the United States Constitution and List of United States federal executive orders The executive power in the federal government is vested in the President of the United States, [7] although power is often delegated to the Cabinet members and other officials.

President of the United States Seal of the President of the United States The executive branch consists of the president and those to whom the president's powers are delegated.

where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

The president is both the head of state and governmentas well as the military commander-in-chief and chief diplomat. The president, according to the Constitution, must "take care that the laws be faithfully executed", and "preserve, protect and defend the Constitution". The president presides over the executive branch of the federal government, an organization numbering about 5 million people, including 1 million active-duty military personnel andpostal service employees.

The president may sign legislation passed by Congress into law or may veto it, preventing it from becoming law unless two-thirds of both houses of Congress vote to override the veto.

The president may unilaterally sign treaties with foreign nations. However, ratification of international treaties requires a two-thirds majority vote in the Senate. The president may be impeached by a majority in the House and removed from office by a two-thirds majority in the Senate for " treasonbriberyor other high crimes and misdemeanors ".

The president may not dissolve Congress or call special elections but does have the power to pardon or release criminals convicted of offenses against the federal government except in cases of impeachmentenact executive ordersand with the consent of the Senate appoint Supreme Court justices and federal judges.

where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

Vice president Main article: Vice President of the United States Seal of the Vice President of the United States The vice president is the second-highest official in rank of the federal government. The office of the vice president's duties and powers are established in the legislative branch of the federal government under Article 1, Section 3, Clauses 4 and 5 as the President of the Senate ; this means that he or she is the designated presiding officer of the Senate.

In that capacity, the vice president has the authority ex officiofor they are not an elected member of the Senate to cast a tie-breaking vote. Pursuant to the Twelfth Amendmentthe vice president presides over the joint session of Congress when it convenes to count the vote of the Electoral College.

This system of equal representation in the Senate benefits smaller states, as they have a disproportionate influence relative to their size. Senators serve six-year terms, and there is no limit to how many terms they can serve.

Only one-third of the Senate is up for election every two years. According to the Constitution, a prospective senator must be at least 30 years old and have been a U.

The Levels of Government

Like representatives, they must also live in the state they represent. The vice president is not only second in command of the executive branch, but also president of the Senate. If there is a tie in the Senate when voting on a piece of legislation, the vice president casts the deciding vote.

Legislative Branch

Legislative Agencies and Political Parties In addition to the two houses of Congress, the legislative branch includes a number of legislative agencies that support Congress in carrying out its duties. Though the Constitution did not mention political parties, they have grown into one of the key institutions of the U.

where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

Since the midth century, the two dominant parties in the United States have been the Republicans and the Democrats. In both chambers of Congress, there is a majority party and a minority party based on which party holds the most seats. In addition to the speaker of the House, who is the leader of the majority party, there is also a majority leader and a minority leader.

Both majority and minority parties choose representatives to serve as whips, who count votes and mediate between party leadership and regular members of Congress. What Does the Legislative Branch Do?

where do major branches of our federal government meet and work

After a bill is introduced, a small group or committee meets to research it, ask questions and make additions or changes.